Make mistakes

John Lennon poster 1 — digital illustration, 2011

John Lennon poster 1 — digital illustration, 2011

John Lennon poster 2 — digital illustration, 2011

John Lennon poster 2 — digital illustration, 2011

“Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep.” Scott Adams

The first image was created by following a tutorial on Tuts+ (the design is based on street artist Shepard Fairey’s Obama campaign posters). The second image was a mistake* I made when messing around with layers in Illustrator.

*Visit this post if you would like to know what I really think about mistakes.

Creating yourself

Finger puppet selfie —student project — 2010

Finger puppet selfie —student project — 2010

“Life isn’t about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself.” George Bernard Shaw

My thanks to Sergio Fox, a.k.a. Optimistic Kid, for the quote.

The very small painting with the really long title

Where shadows grow long at the foot of the mountain, ghost trees shine like gold. Acrylic on canvas, 102 x 102 mm, 2014

Where shadows grow long
at the foot of the mountain,
ghost trees shine like gold.
Acrylic on canvas, 102 x 102 mm, 2014

Ghost trees, Arthur’s Pass, original photo, 2013 — Cropped and Photoshopped, 2014 (click to embiggen)

Ghost trees, Arthur’s Pass, original photo, 2013 — Cropped and Photoshopped, 2014 (click to embiggen)

The really long title is also a haiku. I’m thinking it may be the first of a series of mini canvas + haiku combinations.

The painting is based on another phone-camera image edited in Photoshop. Good old Photoshop! And yes, the painting is for sale.

Shoot it, Sketch it: Southern Alps, Oxford

Southern Alps, Oxford – acrylic on canvas, 204 x 204 mm, 2014

Southern Alps, Oxford – acrylic on canvas, 204 x 204 mm, 2014

Southern Alps, Oxford, original photo, 2012 — Cropped and Photoshopped photo, 2014

Southern Alps, Oxford, original photo, 2012 — Cropped and Photoshopped, 2014 (click to embiggen)

Question: when is a bad, low-res phone photo a good photo? Answer: when it’s the only one you’ve got. After opening my horribly pixelated image in Photoshop, I lightened it a little and messed around with artistic filters until I had something I didn’t object to looking at, printed it, and painted it. The details you would normally expect to see in a ‘good’ photo were slightly blurred and kind of painterly even before I started working on the canvas — which was an unexpected bonus because it meant not having to squint (a time-honoured technique for getting rid of unnecessary details). I really like not having to squint.

It is now for sale on Etsy and on my ‘Paintings for sale’ page.