Time warp (pen vs earthquake)

Pen vs earthquake #7 – Jubilee Clock Tower, 2014
Pen vs earthquake #7 – Jubilee Clock Tower, 2014

This coming Sunday will be the fourth anniversary of the magnitude 6.3 earthquake that rocked Christchurch (22nd February 2011). Four years on and we are still the City of Orange Road Cones. One sign of progress is the restoration of the Jubilee Clock Tower ― the road cones are now gone and the clock is no longer frozen in time!

Jubilee Clock Tower, 2014
Jubilee Clock Tower, 2014
Other pen vs earthquake updates:

The deconstructed band rotunda Retour is still in a sorry state. I have no idea what they plan to do with the dome that has been salvaged.

As far as I know, Christchurch resident Peter Croft is still planning to restore Shand’s Emporium but progress has been slow, apparently due to new city council rules and regulations.
Update: Shand’s Emporium touches down on Manchester Street, Christchurch. June 2015

The Octagon is being repaired and earthquake strengthened, and work is finally underway on Mona Vale Homestead. If all goes according to plan, Mona Vale will re-open in June 2016.

My pen vs earthquake sketches are originally from a student project. Ben Heine’s ingenious Pencil Vs Camera images inspired the series.

Honouring our past

Anna Cull Earthquake editorial quote

“If we do not honour our past, we lose our future. If we destroy our roots, we cannot grow.” Friedensreich Hundertwasser

Commemorating the 2011 Christchurch earthquake in which 185 people lost their lives. Many homes, businesses and heritage buildings were destroyed. We are still a city in recovery. This is a period in history which will, no doubt, be remembered as both the breaking and the making of our city.

The way things are

Pen vs earthquake buildings in situ
Pen vs earthquake buildings in situ
Christchurch, looking northeast, December 2013
Christchurch, looking northeast, December 2013

Following on from yesterday’s pen vs earthquake post, here are a couple of aerial photographs showing the location of three more buildings from the series. I’ve included Cathedral Square for context. Click on the photos for a closer look.

I wish I had a ‘before’ photo to show you that the landscape in these photos is just plain wrong ― beige and boxy and wrong…

Christchurch, looking southwest, December 2013
Christchurch, looking southwest, December 2013

The Church is fine (pen vs earthquake)

Anna Cull Pen vs earthquake Oxford Tce

Built in 1881, the Oxford Terrace Baptist Church was one of the many buildings conspicuously absent from the landscape when we flew over Christchurch last month. I’ve circled the relevant piece of dirt in the photograph below (click on the photo for a closer look). The building was badly damaged by the September 2010 earthquakes and then completely collapsed in the February 2011 earthquake. It was famous for having a sign out the front which read: “Our building is cracked, the Church is fine!” Although the neoclassical structure (an unusual style for Christchurch) is not going to be rebuilt, there are reports that the damaged Oamaru stone is to be used in a sculpture ― what a wonderful way of honouring the spirit and tenacity of its congregation.

Where Oxford Terrace Baptist Church isn’t, Christchurch, 2013
Where Oxford Terrace Baptist Church isn’t, Christchurch, 2013

Anna Cull Pen vs earthquake Oxford Tce comparison

The sketch is originally from this student project. Ben Heine’s ingenious Pencil Vs Camera images were my inspiration for this series.

Above and beyond

A little jaunt over Christchurch last week in a 1944 DC-3 has yielded quite a crop of new photographs… I’m really pleased with them, especially considering how small the window was and that we were basically right over one of the wings! Anna Cull DC3 Amy (officially ZK-AMY) is a fairly rare bird and will, sadly, be retiring early next year. The day of our flight was quite hazy and more than a little bumpy but the experience was pure magic. Amy will soon be on permanent display at the Ashburton Aviation Museum.Anna Cull DC3 flight The photos not only show Canterbury’s beautiful farmland in all its patchwork glory, they also show how altered Christchurch is ― earthquakes have removed many familiar landmarks and made the cityscape rather beige and boxy ― but perhaps that is a post better left for another day.