Tag Archives: In the style of…

In the style of… Brian Wildsmith

Diptych of daisies, Akaroa, 2009

Diptych of daisies, Akaroa, 2009

Diptych of daisies – acrylic on canvas, 175 x 230 mm (each), 2014

Diptych of daisies – acrylic on canvas, 175 x 230 mm (each), 2014

A little nature study…

Diptych of daisies (one)

Diptych of daisies (one)

Diptych of daisies (two)

Diptych of daisies (two)

Brian Wildsmith

Brian Wildsmith – illustrations from Birds (1967) and Squirrels (1974) Images from http://eye-likey.blogspot.com

Brian Wildsmith – illustrations from Birds (1967) and Squirrels (1974)
Images from http://eye-likey.blogspot.com

Brian Wildsmith (born 1930) has written and illustrated more than eighty books. I love his use of colour and the way he combines abstract textures with carefully considered details. And his animals… his animals have such life and personality. You can check out his website here.

In the style of… appears occasionally instead of my regular Shoot it, Sketch it posts. Using my own photographs as a starting point, I’m drawing inspiration from some of the world’s greatest illustrators. It’s not about slavishly copying someone else’s art; it’s an experiment in seeing things differently.

In the style of… Aubrey Hammond

The Press – ink, watercolour pencil and digital, 190 x 140 mm, 2014

The Press – ink, watercolour pencil and digital, 190 x 140 mm, 2014

The Press, Christchurch, 2010

The Press, Christchurch, 2010

Getting inspired by the 1920s…

Aubrey Hammond

Book cover (1927) and London Underground poster (1923) Images from www.sf-foundation.org and www.ltmuseumshop.co.uk

Aubrey Hammond – book cover (1927) and London Underground poster (1923)
Images from www.sf-foundation.org and www.ltmuseumshop.co.uk

British artist Aubrey Hammond (1894–1940) is responsible some of my favourite1920s London Underground posters. He also illustrated several books and taught commercial and theatrical design. I think his cover for Metropolis, Thea von Harbou’s novel designed to complement the movie (co-written with husband Fritz Lang), is simply stunning.

In the style of… appears occasionally instead of my regular Shoot it, Sketch it posts. Using my own photographs as a starting point, I’m drawing inspiration from some of the world’s greatest illustrators. It’s not about slavishly copying someone else’s art; it’s an experiment in seeing things differently.

In the style of… Evaline Ness

The convention – ink and watercolour, 205 x 255 mm, 2013

The convention – ink and watercolour, 205 x 255 mm, 2013

Seagulls at Lake Rotorua, 2013

Seagulls at Lake Rotorua, 2013

I’ve only recently discovered Evaline Ness (although the illustrations in Sam, Bangs and Moonshine do seem curiously familiar). Her work is delightful and quirky across a wide range of styles and mediums. I particularly like the bold lines and restricted use of colour in the illustrations below. The reference photo is yet another one taken using my nothing-special cellphone ― which explains the appalling quality ― but it’s still good enough for sketching purposes. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again (and I’m quoting photographer Chase Jarvis here), the best camera is the one you have with you. I’m starting to think it may be time to invest in a better phone… or a smaller camera.

Evaline Ness

Evaline Ness — illustrations from Joey and the Birthday Present, written by Maxine Kumin and Anne Sexton (1971) Images from http://myvintagebookcollectioninblogform.blogspot.co.nz

Evaline Ness — illustrations from Joey and the Birthday Present, written by Maxine Kumin and Anne Sexton (1971)
Images from http://myvintagebookcollectioninblogform.blogspot.co.nz

American artist Evaline Ness (1911–1986) has several claims to fame. As well as being an extremely versatile illustrator and author of children’s books, she was also a fashion model, a fashion illustrator and was, at one time, married to FBI investigator Elliot Ness. It sounds like a movie just waiting to happen.

In the style of… appears occasionally instead of my regular Shoot it, Sketch it posts. Using my own photographs as a starting point, I’m drawing inspiration from some of the world’s greatest illustrators. It’s not about slavishly copying someone else’s art; it’s an experiment in seeing things differently.

In the style of… Maurice Sendak

St Germain and the tree – ink and watercolour, 297 x 210 mm, 2013

St Germain and the tree – ink and watercolour, 297 x 210 mm, 2013

St Germain – Christchurch, 2010

St Germain – Christchurch, 2010

If this looks a little familiar, that’s probably because the reference photograph was taken right next to the one I used for last week’s sketch. This time I used watercolour pencils and my trusty Staedtler pigment liners and took inspiration from one of my favourite illustrators, Maurice Sendak. You can see the early stages of my sketch below. (St Germain is the name of the restaurant in the photo.)

Work in progress #1 – watercolour pencil sketch Work in progress #2 – after adding water

Work in progress #1 – watercolour pencil sketch
Work in progress #2 – after adding water

Maurice Sendak

Maurice Sendak – illustrations from Where the Wild Things Are (1963) Images from http://mrbiggs.com

Maurice Sendak – illustrations from Where the Wild Things Are (1963)
Images from http://mrbiggs.com

Everyone has heard of American illustrator and author Maurice Sendak (1928–2012), haven’t they? And even if you don’t know his name, I’m sure you’ll be familiar with his wonderful book Where the Wild Things Are.

In the style of… appears occasionally instead of my regular Shoot it, Sketch it posts. Using my own photographs as a starting point, I’m drawing inspiration from some of the world’s greatest illustrators. It’s not about slavishly copying someone else’s art; it’s an experiment in seeing things differently.

In the style of… Fougasse

Tram – ink and digital, 297 x 210 mm, 2013

Tram – ink and digital, 297 x 210 mm, 2013

Tram (edited and unedited photos) – Christchurch, 2010

Tram (edited and original photos) – Christchurch, 2010

Simple lines and a few splashes of colour. I really enjoyed this one — does it show?

Fougasse

Posters from 1944 Images from www.pickmix.co.uk

Posters from 1944
Images from www.pickmix.co.uk

Fougasse was the nom de plume of London-born cartoonist Cyril Kenneth Bird (1887–1965). I’m a big fan of the posters he designed for the London Underground. I love the simplicity of these illustrations — and the humour.

In the style of… appears occasionally instead of my regular Shoot it, Sketch it posts. Using my own photographs as a starting point, I’m drawing inspiration from some of the world’s greatest illustrators. It’s not about slavishly copying someone else’s art; it’s an experiment in seeing things differently.